Non-Consensual Releases of Third Parties Approved by Bankruptcy Court

Admin on March 30, 2022 Posted in Bankruptcy Law, Bankruptcy News, Blog

In February 2020, as one of several decisions concerning third-party releases (TPRs), a bankruptcy court judge confirmed a reorganization plan and its associated debtor entities which include third-party releases. As part of the plan’s confirmation, the judge noted recent decisions that introduced concerns involving a court’s authority in approving non-consensual (NC) TPRs but applied Third […]

Appellate Court Consider Statute of Limitations Following Bankruptcy Discharge

Admin on March 16, 2022 Posted in Bankruptcy Law, Blog

In January 2022, a Washington appellate court reaffirmed a regulation connected to real estate foreclosures and the statute of limitations following a discharge of bankruptcy. The regulation is that a bankruptcy court does not automatically raise the six-year statute of limitations associated with trust foreclosure. The outcome of this case is important because Washington state […]

Rennaker v. Davis Highlights What Cannot be Discharged in Bankruptcy

Admin on January 10, 2022 Posted in Articles, Bankruptcy News, Blog

The recent Rennaker case involved various claims addressing what is dischargeable under both 11 U.S.C. section 523 and section 727. The Judge’s decision, in this case, provides a detailed examination of legal actions concerning what can be discharged in bankruptcy.  How the Case Arose The debtor in the proceeding was a lawyer who handled primarily […]

Federal Circuit Court Rules Some Student Loans Can be Discharged in Bankruptcy

Admin on December 9, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy Law, Blog, Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

In the recent circuit court case of Homaidan v. Sallie Mae, Inc., a federal circuit court held that a ruling by a New York bankruptcy court that private loans to pay for college education are not exempt from being discharged under the Bankruptcy Code’s Section 523. This section of the Bankruptcy Code excludes from discharge […]

The Issuers of Stock Held Liable for Double-Pledge

Admin on August 30, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy News, Blog

A Louisiana bankruptcy court, in the Karcredit LLC case, recently considered a case involving two lenders and one stock certificate. At the heart of the Karcredit case was a party who relied on a stock certificate to satisfy loan duties owed to another party. After a replacement certificate was reissued, one party relied on this […]

Avoidance Powers After the U.S. Glove Case Ruling Examines Whether Benefit Required for Avoidance Power

Admin on August 15, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy Law, Blog

Under the US Bankruptcy Code, various powers are granted to debtors, creditors, and other parties involved with the bankruptcy process. One such power is found in section 544, which grants individuals the ability to avoid some interactions with bankruptcy trustees or debtors-in-possession. Questions, however, have lingered about whether  avoidance powers can only be exercised when […]

Court Rules Recoupment Requires Proof of Emotional Distress

Admin on May 15, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy News, Blog

In April, a bankruptcy court entered a judgment in favor of a national bank, determining that the plaintiff had failed to establish that he had experienced an injury involving economic or emotional distress damages due to the lender’s violations. During Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceedings, the plaintiff initiated legal action against the bank and a loan […]

Bankruptcy Trustee Powers Removed by Congress

Admin on April 15, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy Law, Bankruptcy News, Blog

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, a large number of commercial tenants have to contend with the challenge of whether local or state regulations permitted their organization to remain open. Unfortunately, this means that many companies have been unable to generate revenue for the past year.  Given the financial hardships faced by many people […]

How In Re Shin Could Influence Which Bankruptcy Taxes are Dischargeable

Admin on March 30, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy News, Blog

In a recent bankruptcy case (In Re Shin), a court questioned whether the recapture obligation of the first-time homebuyer credit constitutes a “tax” that can be applied to the non-discharge provision of the bankruptcy code. This credit refers to a tax credit established by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. The credit, which […]

Court Split Occurs Involving Whether Section 546(e) “Financial Participant” Excludes Debtors

Admin on March 15, 2021 Posted in Bankruptcy News, Blog

In December 2020, a Delaware bankruptcy court held that the term “financial participant” as used in the safe harbor provisions of Section 546(e) of the Bankruptcy Code does not unequivocally exclude debtors. The Delaware court’s ruling is notable because it marks a split from a 2019 Southern District of New York court ruling. The Issue […]